ENEC Admin

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Malawi is hosting a three-day long Southern Africa Regional Police Chiefs Organisation (SARPCO) meeting on environmental crimes investigations in the capital Lilongwe.The meeting, which began on Wednesday and runs until Friday, has been organized to share experiences, ideas, best practices and reinforce a collective approach to organized crimes in respective countries and the region as a whole. Original source: http://en.starafrica.com/news/malawi-hosts-regional-meeting-on-combating-environmental-crime.html

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Madrid,15th February 2015. On 11th February 2015 was held in Madrid the First European Workshop against Environmental Crime which brings together members of the European Network Against Environmental Crime (ENEC). The event, organized by SEO/BirdLife, was focused on improving the prosecution of environmental crimes in Europe, including crimes against wildlife and especially illegal killing and taking of birds. In total, the

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Apart from causing economic losses, environmental crime is a serious and growing international problem that has devastating effects on environment and human health. Some actions that could be consider as environmental crime are the illegal killing of wildlife, use of poisoned baits, habitat destructions, illegal trade in wildlife, emission or discharge of substances into air, water or soil, illegal trade

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As of 7 November 2014, maximum penalties significantly increased for a range of offences under the Environmental Protection Act 1994 (Qld) (EP Act). For some offences, this has resulted in more than a 300% increase in the maximum penalty. For instance, where the maximum penalty for a wilful contravention of a condition of an environmental authority was previously $1,138,500, it

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Combined estimates from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), UNEP and INTERPOL place the monetary value of all environmental crime – which includes logging, poaching and trafficking of a wide range of animals, illegal fisheries, illegal mining and dumping of toxic waste – at between US$70 and US$213 billion